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Academic mobility and impact

Academic mobility and impact

Two articles in Nature was nicely summarized in an Economist article recently. The key point is: The more open countries are and internationally mobile and connected researchers in a country are, the more artices with high citation are produced. It is worth noting...

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Things about a PhD nobody told you about

Things about a PhD nobody told you about

Great talk on aspects of a Ph.D. noone talk about. (My notes on what was said below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAKsQf77nHU There are 740 000 students enrolled in a phd in Europe. 2/1000 are in a phd program. (see below for statistics)   7 things nobody told...

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Free speech and acceptable norms

This podcast episode of Hidden Brain, on the topic of free speech, uses research during and after the Trump presidential campaign, and classic Bandura research, to  show how it can change perceptions of what constitutes acceptable thoughts and opinions. It further...

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“Interesting” research

There is a focus on producing so-called interesting research. This essay: Organizational sciences’ obsession with “that’s interesting!” Consequences and an alternative  by Madan M. Pillutla and Stefan Thau They lay out an argument for why interesting findings and...

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Nvivo for litterature review

This post is a work in progress, as I try using Nvivo to get a systematic overview of my field of study; and where I store links and resources I have found useful. A complete post will follow when I have a conclusion (of whether to stop, or go on :)) It might be...

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What is a “Meta Analysis”

Meta analysis' are often considered the gold standard for studies; a single study is never conclusive due to potential errors in design or data, whereas when results from many studies are systematically analyzed, they can be. Here is a YouTube series that goes through...

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Endogeneity… What it is, and potential sources

Endogeneity has received attention in the past decade, as a significant source of bias in results reported in a wide variety of studies. Papers can now be desk rejected by top journals if there is reason to believe there may be endogeneity at play. Endogeneity refers...

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On doing better science – Leader by Antonakis

John Antonakis is the new editor of Leaderhip Quarterly, and in his first leader, he lays out what he sees as important going forward, and possible perils in the field of leadership research. Quote from the article: Because of the incentive structures that...

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Some may enjoy reading this..

..and spend a couple of minutes studying the graph. A graph showing what people think of when using unspecific terms like: "some", "a few", "many", as well as various types of probabilities. Rather interesting.. as well as a short discussion on what to do with...

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“Why people prefer unequal societies”

In thier article, Starmans, Sheskin and Bloom presents the compelling argument that most people are concerned about fairness when it comes to distribution of resources, and prefer unequal outcomes, as long as there is a merit or needs based reason for the inequality....

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The role of narratives in how information spreads

When theorizing about the world and how information is spread, it is easy to assume that better information will prevail, and, when conducting social network analysis, that all information is equal, it is all about the structure and characteristics of the node. This...

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The natural selection of bad science

This paper lays out the argument that flawed research design, methods and analysis (all be it unintentional) will yield results in greater volume and that are more novel and surprising; and thus, also greater rate of publishing. As publishing is a key factor in...

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Selection bias and the use of success stories

While it is obvious when stated, it is still a sad fact that the popular business press continues to write hero stories and generalize from business successes. This article from HBR is a quick introduction to why this can lead one to draw the wrong conclusions....

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How statistics lost their power

Interesting historical perspective, and why statistics as a tool to form policy and public opinion may loose its effect in the time to come. some points: the nation is a misleading entity to use; while some cities flourish and grow, other regions are hit hard; an...

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How should academics be evaluated?

Great article titled: "“Am I Famous Yet?” Judging Scholarly Merit in Psychological Science. An Introduction" by Robert J. Sternberg; which discusses the various metrics used, their shortcomings and what changes in how academics will be judged in the future. A good...

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How to attend a conference

While interesting to go, my first academic conference did not exactly give me high returns on the investment. Did I "do it" in the best way possible? Definitely not. This article gives a quick summary of what I should been doing 🙂 In short: Define your goals Do your...

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Building Effective Networks

Herminia Ibarra is a professor of Organizational Behavior at INSEAD, and ranked as one of the most influential management thinkers, on one list as number 8.  http://thinkers50.com/t50-ranking/2015-2/ In the linked 15 minute video, she presents her thoughts on...

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Friends with academic benefits

Friends with academic benefits

This article studies college students, from a sociological perspective, using network theory analysis and qualitative work. The key findings: Student’s social networks fall into three types: tight knitters, compartmentalizes and samplers. Tight Knitters: all friends...

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Competing against luck

Competing against luck

Clayton Christensen gives a lecture on his new book; the key point is: Focus on what problem you are solving for the customer; not what your product can do, or what you can offer. His example from McDonalds is: What problem does their Milkshake solve: answer: a snack...

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How to network with purpose mutual effect

As with so many activities, networking is a craft to be learnt. If done well..  It benefit both you and your network.. Here are some advice from a leading researcher in the field. For  network to have value, it needs to have relevant and potentially strategically...

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Understanding the American demographic

Sitting safely in Norway, reading about the American election in various major global news outlets, it is hard to understand how Trump won the GOP primary, let alone is head to head with Clinton in the race for the Whitehouse. Clearly, there is something I have not...

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